Illuminate, Energize by the Light.

yagazieemezi:

First Australians

In Australian media, there is no shortage of coverage of the Aboriginal population. And, according to photographer Amy Toensing, the coverage is not always favorable."On paper, the truth is there’s some really hard stuff going on [within the Aboriginal population] — like with alcoholism and education," Toensing says over the phone from New York.

So when she convinced National Geographic in 2009 to invest in a long-term documentary about Aboriginal culture, Toensing decided to take a different approach:

"It’s about people and how they are still connected to the land," she says of her work. "The moment you start spending time in Aboriginal communities … you can tell there’s this really powerful connection to the Australian landscape."

Nearly four years after starting the project, Toensing’s work has culminated in National Geographic's June issue. The article takes a comprehensive look at life in Aboriginal communities today — and includes a few striking facts, like: “More than a half million Aboriginals currently live in Australia, less than three percent of the [original] population.”

Although stories like these often emphasize “a community in decline,” Toensing’s photos celebrate what has endured. And although the story has gone to print, for Toensing it’s to be continued. 

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic


b-undt:
rusticmeetsvintage:
Edge Reps: Ditte Isager
™
罪人 + 情人

b-undt:

rusticmeetsvintage:

Edge Reps: Ditte Isager

罪人 + 情人

(via honey-eyed)

otipemsiw:

assangistan:

MUST SEE
via hick-ups:

A photograph from the 1870’s showing tens of thousands of bison skulls. They were mass slaughtered by the U.S. Army to make room for cattle and force Native American tribes into starvation.


[bolding mine]
Mass slaughter of buffalo and bison took place in Canadian territory as well, and was part of a deliberate campaign to break Indigenous resistance to (further) settler incursions onto Native land and the railroad.  The removal of the buffalo also meant that when it came time to sign treaties, the Canadian government could more or less set any terms it saw fit and Indigenous leaders basically had to comply with them or their people would freeze and starve (that’s if gov officials even bothered to translate the actual terms of the treaty at all).
The “disappearance” of the buffalo is narrativized as part of a larger myth surrounding the “disappearing Indian” whose absence clears the land for the incoming white pioneers to take their place.  The murder, destruction, slaughter of bison and buffalo was a tactic essential to the genocidal colonial project. 

otipemsiw:

assangistan:

MUST SEE

via hick-ups:

A photograph from the 1870’s showing tens of thousands of bison skulls. They were mass slaughtered by the U.S. Army to make room for cattle and force Native American tribes into starvation.

[bolding mine]

Mass slaughter of buffalo and bison took place in Canadian territory as well, and was part of a deliberate campaign to break Indigenous resistance to (further) settler incursions onto Native land and the railroad.  The removal of the buffalo also meant that when it came time to sign treaties, the Canadian government could more or less set any terms it saw fit and Indigenous leaders basically had to comply with them or their people would freeze and starve (that’s if gov officials even bothered to translate the actual terms of the treaty at all).

The “disappearance” of the buffalo is narrativized as part of a larger myth surrounding the “disappearing Indian” whose absence clears the land for the incoming white pioneers to take their place.  The murder, destruction, slaughter of bison and buffalo was a tactic essential to the genocidal colonial project. 

(via lovelylisa22)

(Source: empresslove, via pharaohn)

heyfranhey:

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heyfranhey:

You guys have been asking me about healthy sweeteners. I suggest using raw honey or putting dates into a food processor making a paste that will then be stored in a mason jar. Or buy this plant-based vegan honey, Bee Free, made from apples. Listen, this is SO good you’ll forget it’s healthy. Only 4 ingredients: Organic apples, water, non-GMO vegan sugar cane and lemon juice. I use it when my green smoothies need a sweet fix or for my oatmeal and tea. Start cutting back on sugar, you have way more options! I buy this at Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s or on Amazon. Let’s keep pushing!